anna brones

writer + artist + producer

Posts Tagged ‘Food

If Only I Had Room for a Garden…

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spring in paris

As the sun comes out (hello spring!) I only have one thing on my mind: I want a garden. A place to walk in barefoot. A place to plant seedlings. Grow tomatoes and green beans and cucumbers. A place to start a raspberry vine. Wild strawberries. A space to sit and drink a morning cup of coffee.

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Written by Anna Brones

March 21, 2014 at 17:21

What is Food Gentrification?

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Have you heard about the new term “food gentrification“? It’s this week’s topic on Foodie Underground.

“Food gentrification” started as a hashtag by writer Mikki Kendall, who wrote about the impact of turning ordinary products into trendy ones, and the ultimate social impact. “My grandmother was a master of turning offal into delicious, and I still use many of her recipes to this day. But now, once-affordable ingredients have been discovered by trendy chefs, and have been transformed into haute cuisine. Food is facing gentrification that may well put traditional meals out of reach for those who created the recipes,” Kendall wrote in January.

Just like rebuilding neighborhoods has shot up real estate prices and pushed out locals, rebuilding the food movement, putting certain common-day vegetables on a pedestal, in turn making them more expensive, is pushing people away from eating them.

There was a time when we all had access to fresh food and ingredients. Think back to our grandparents. There were few things available, but the things that were available were real food. There were vegetables, there was fruit and there were no Doritos. Often there was a garden. People ate real food simply because it was the only thing available.

Hop on over to Foodie Underground to read the full article.

Written by Anna Brones

March 19, 2014 at 12:08

When it Comes to Food, Are We Superficial?

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I’ve been thinking a lot about food and food marketing lately, and feeling a bit frustrated that we’re quick to hop on board and buy trendy foods instead of just eating what’s good for us. It’s the topic of this week’s Foodie Underground column.

“We like to accuse the industrial food world of using food marketing to keep people eating unhealthy, citing examples of sugar cereal that’s branded as part of a complete breakfast. But let’s not kid ourselves, the healthy food world does it too.

Take the example of superfoods. First of all, there is no exact definition of the word “superfood.” You can slap that name on any food that is power-packed with nutrients. Second of all, do you know where your superfoods are coming from? Sure, goji berries might be good for your health, but the majority of them are grown on industrial fields in China. We say we want to be locavores and then we go dousing our salads in berries and grains that are imported from across the world.”

Read the full article here.

Written by Anna Brones

February 26, 2014 at 09:26

Food Waste: Creative Solutions to a Big Problem

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regrained

Did you know that about 40% of the food produced in the US goes uneaten? Food waste is a serious issue.

I was happy to contribute a piece to one of my favorite food sites Civil Eats on the topic, profiling different businesses and organizations that are putting food waste to use in interesting ways. My favorite? A company using beer grains to make granola bars and another making brownies out of leftover grapes from the winemaking process:

4. If you’ve ever brewed your own beer, you know that it takes a lot of grain. And what happens to that grain once the beer is done? Some brewers compost with it, some (of the very committed) bake with it, but most often it gets thrown out. That’s why Dan Kurzrock and Jordan Schwartz launched Regrained, a business that makes granola bars out of spent malted barley. According to the pair, “only 10 percent of the ingredients used to brew end up in your glass.”

5. In winemaking, all the leftover stuff that comes after the grapes have been crushed is called pomace. More often than not, it’s destined for the compost or the dump. But Whole Vine Products takes a different route, using this byproduct in baked goods. In fact, they work with a local mill to turn the pomace into a gluten-free flour. They also make culinary oils from the grape seeds. Anyone care for a Cabernet brownie?

Read the full article and learn about the other projects, including making jam from food waste, here.

Image: Regrained

Written by Anna Brones

February 20, 2014 at 09:00

Vote for Foodie Underground in The Kitchn’s Favorite Health + Diet Cooking Blog!

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Ok, so beyond running, drinking coffee and writing, I keep up the site Foodie Underground. And it’s currently on the nomination list for The Kitchn’s Favorite Health & Diet Cooking Blog.

I would of course make me ever so happy if you went and gave it a vote.

Written by Anna Brones

February 19, 2014 at 15:54

The Obligation of Food Lovers

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“If you are a food lover, then you have an obligation to think about what you’re eating. You have an obligation to know where your food comes from, and you have an obligation to know how the broken food system is negatively affecting so much of the population. We have to start to learn how to turn passion for food into a passion for improving the food system, taking the pleasure that we get from eating and transforming it into advocating for real food, not only for the privileged, but for everyone.”

From this week’s Foodie Underground column on EcoSalon.

Written by Anna Brones

February 12, 2014 at 14:14

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The Changing Coffee Scene in Paris

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Image

Call a spade a spade: most coffee in Paris isn’t good. But thankfully that’s changing. I had the chance to have some in depth chats with roasters and baristas in town over the last couple of months to talk about that change, culminating in an article for Roads & Kingdoms. An excerpt:

The tide is turning in the French capital, though, with a flood of new craft roasters and cafes that all believe in good coffee. The French, however, are sensitive to change, especially in a city that’s known for its deep-rooted traditions, and while this expanding coffee scene is welcomed by many, it also comes with a side of criticism. For some, local craft roast might be the sign of a city looking forward, yet for others it’s the sign of a city undergoing an irrevocable transformation in food culture.

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Written by Anna Brones

January 29, 2014 at 03:21