anna brones

writer + artist + activist

Posts Tagged ‘recipe

Swedish Cinnamon Buns (with Apple Filling) to Celebrate Kanelbullens Dag

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Swedish cinnamon buns are so iconic that they get their very own day: October 4th. That’s right, today is the official Kanelbullens Dag. And you know what you should do to celebrate? Make a batch of cinnamon buns and invite a friend over for fika.

I don’t make kanelbullar very regularly, so when I do it’s a special affair. (Quick Swedish lesson: kanelbulle is singular, kanelbullar is plural.)

For the uninitiated, kanelbullar carry a lot of importance in Swedish food culture. It’s a staple of fika, and baking them at home is a special affair. Thinking about kanelbullar and my own connection to them makes me think of this passage from my friend Sara Bir’s book The Fruit Forager’s Companion:

“It would be wonderful to make and eat pie every day, but that is unrealistic for most of us… As it stands, I do not make pies for special occasions, but allow the pie itself to be the occasion. That way, if someone asks me how I am, I can simply say, ‘I ate piece today,’ and they know I am well.”

The way Sara feels about pie is how I feel about kanelbullar. You don’t need a special occasion to make them. Instead they turn an ordinary day into something much more exciting. Baking kanelbullar is an act of celebrating the everyday.

While I certainly enjoy the pure, unadulterated version, I often enjoy experimenting with different flours and fillings. My current favorite is to make them with whole wheat flour (I use hard white wheat from Bluebird Grain Farms) and let the dough rise overnight. I find that this slower rise makes for a slightly more interesting taste. To take full advantage of the fall season, these kanelbullar are filled with grated apple. You can certainly go classic and make it without that addition.

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Written by Anna Brones

October 4, 2018 at 08:45

Strawberry Cardamom Cordial

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Making cordial is the perfect way to use up all of those slightly mashed strawberries that tend to be leftover when you have bought a few more than you can eat in a couple of days. In fact, that’s how this recipe came to be.

I add cardamom to basically everything, but the spice pairs particularly well with strawberries. You can mix this cordial with straight water, sparkling water, or even combine with other libations for a summer cocktail.

This makes about a cup and a half of cordial, so scale up if you would like to make a larger batch.

Ingredients:

About 17 ounces/500 grams of strawberries, rinsed and cut in half

1 cup (240 milliliters) water

3 teaspoons cardamom seeds, crushed

1/2 cup (3.5 ounces, 100) grams of sugar

Juice and zest of half a small lemon

Preparation:

Place the strawberries, water and crushed cardamom seeds in a saucepan. Place on the stove and bring to a boil. Simmer for about 15 minutes, stirring every once in awhile with a fork or spoon and using it to crush the strawberries.

Once the strawberries have fully broken down, remove from the heat and let sit for about half an hour.

Strain the strawberry pulp out, using a cheesecloth or fine mesh strainer.

Measure the liquid. You want to add in about half that amount of sugar. Measuring by weight is more precise, but you can measure by volume too (i.e. with a cup).

Pour the liquid into a clean saucepan and place on medium heat. Slowly add the sugar and stir until dissolved. Bring to a boil, and let simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and pour into a clean bottle or jar.

Written by Anna Brones

June 20, 2018 at 16:08

Camp Cooking: Coconut Ginger Vermicelli Noodles

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This weekend marks the fourth annual Swift Campout, a global call to get people out for a night and bike camp, hosted by Swift Industries. And what do you need for a good bike camping trip? Good food.

This recipe for Coconut Ginger Vermicelli Noodles is one that I originally made for the MSR Summit Register blog. It’s a recipe that’s perfect for an overnight trip as you can prep a few of the ingredients at home and then throw the whole thing together at camp.

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Written by Anna Brones

June 19, 2018 at 10:30

Sliced Rye and Almond Pepparkakor

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Growing up, we always made a recipe out of the classic Swedish baking book Sju sorters kakor, called Franska pepparkakor, French gingersnaps, for Christmas. Why they were French I am not entirely sure. I have lived in France and never encountered anything similar.

A more apt name is skurna pepparkor, sliced gingersnaps. I like making these because they take much less time than rolling out and cutting traditional pepparkakor but still use the same iconic seasonal spices. This year, I adapted the recipe to be a little less sweet and also be made with 100% rye flour. I like making whole grain cookies, because they are far more robust in flavor than baking with traditional all-purpose flour.

These cookies are great on their own, but also pair very well with a little blue cheese. And a mug of glögg of course.

Sliced Rye and Almond Pepparkakor

Ingredients:

1 cup (5 ounces, 140 grams) almonds, coarsely chopped
1 cup (8 ounces, 225 grams) butter, room temperature
1/4 cup (1.75 ounces, 50 gram) sugar
1/4 cup (60 milliliters) molasses
4 teaspoons ground ginger
4 teaspoons ground cinnamon
4 teaspoons ground nutmeg
4 teaspoons cardamom
2 teaspoons cloves
1 teaspoon black pepper
Zest of one orange
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 1/2 cups (8.75 ounces, 250 grams) rye flour

Preparation:

Chop the almonds and set them aside.

Cream the butter, sugar and molasses, then mix in the spices and orange zest until well blended.

Mix the baking soda with the flour, then add to the wet ingredients. Work the dough together (it will be quite sticky).

Form the dough into cylinders, about 12 inches long and wrap in parchment paper or a tea towel. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. (Note: the dough lasts for a few days in the refrigerator so if you don’t get around to baking them right away it’s totally fine.)

Grease a baking tray and cut dough into thin slices. Place the slices on the tray and bake at 375ºF (180ºC) for 10 to 12 minutes.The cookies don’t spread out very much, so you can put them pretty close to each other.

Written by Anna Brones

December 22, 2017 at 07:36

Recipe: Chanterelle Tart with Rye Crust

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In Swedish, chanterelles (and other mushrooms that can be found in the forest this time of year) are often referred to as skogsguld, forest gold. Cooking them up in a pan with a little olive oil or butter is as indicative of autumn to me as the changing colors.

I haven’t been out to harvest any chanterelles this season, but fortunately my friend Adam supplies a good stash, and I like sautéing them and serving on top of a slice of rye bread for a simple warm sandwich.

Another good way to put chanterelles to use is in a tart or quiche. I like making savory tarts because they are fairly straightforward and forgiving; just sauté up whatever you want as a filling, pour some whisked eggs on top and call it a day.

For this one in particular, I wanted a flavorful crust to pair with the earthy chanterelles, so I came up with a rye pastry crust. It’s made up of mostly rye flour and a little oat flour.

This is a cozy recipe, perfect for a blustery autumn day with flickering candles on the kitchen table. Leftovers will be perfect for breakfast the next day too, so be sure to save a few slices.

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Written by Anna Brones

November 2, 2017 at 10:42

A Strawberry Cake to Celebrate Swedish Midsummer

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Summer solstice marks the longest day of the year, and that’s cause for celebration. This week is one of sunshine stretching into the evening, carpets of wildflowers in the midst of grassy fields, bare feet and picnic blankets.

For me, it marks the celebration of Swedish midsommar, which will be celebrated this Friday. The traditional midsommar spread of food is one of my favorites, featuring some of my favorite dishes like marinated cucumbers, pickled herring (which you can even use in a savory cake), and plenty of knäckebröd.

But my favorite part of midsommar has to be dessert. Strawberry cake is one of the most common desserts on the Swedish midsommar table, and it puts seasonal berries front and center. It’s a simple dessert, topped with plenty of whipped cream and bright red berries.

I like to make the cake with cardamom, and even marinate a few strawberries in honey and cardamom to use as the center filling. The cake is cut in half, so that you can layer it, but if you want to make an even fancier cake, consider making two of them and layering them.

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Written by Anna Brones

June 21, 2017 at 07:35

Outdoor Cooking: Cilantro and Tomato Bruschetta

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This summer, I embarked on a bicycle tour – a pedal-powered book tour, in fact! – from my house, west of Seattle, all the way down to San Francisco. As was to be expected, I cooked a lot of food along the way, and now that I am back in front of the computer (far less interesting than being on a bicycle, I assure you) I’ve been busy compiling all the recipes.

The first one went up this week on Adventure Journal and I wanted to share it here because it’s perfect for using up late summer tomatoes. And even if you’re not on a bike trip, this works well as an at-home appetizer too. But soak up those final rays of summer and go enjoy it outdoors!

Cilantro and Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta

  • 2 to 3 medium-sized heirloom tomatoes
  • 4 to 5 cloves garlic
  • A small handful of cilantro leaves, chopped (about 1 to 2 tablespoons chopped leaves)
  • Salt
  • Ground black pepper
  • 8 to 10 slices of bread
  • Olive oil

Chop the tomatoes into small pieces and place them in in a bowl or pot. Finely chop two of the garlic cloves and add them to the tomatoes, along with the cilantro and a pinch of salt and pepper. Drizzle a little olive oil over it and mix together. Taste. Add more salt and pepper as needed.

Place a frying pan or pot over medium heat on your stove and pour in a little olive oil. Grill a slide of bread on both sides, until both sides are a golden brown. Remove the bread slice from the pan and place on a plate. Take a clove of garlic and lightly rub the grilled bread with it. Top with a generous scoop of the tomato and cilantro mixture.

Repeat until you’ve grilled all the bread and used up the tomato and cilantro mixture.

Read the full post here.

Written by Anna Brones

September 9, 2016 at 17:19