anna brones

writer + artist + activist

Posts Tagged ‘Washington

Champagne Champagne Natural Wine Bar (and Shop) on Orcas Island

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“I want to be as serious as I need to be to run this place. Otherwise I don’t give a shit about being serious.” – Amelia Carver, co-owner Champagne Champagne.

My profile of Carver and her partner Brian Crum went up recently on Sprudge Wine. The two run a super cool natural wine bar on Orcas Island in Washington State. In my opinion you never really need an excuse to take a ferry ride, but if you did, this is a good one.

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Written by Anna Brones

September 14, 2018 at 05:47

Would You Like a Scoop of Geoduck Ice Cream?

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Salted caramel ice cream. Orange coriander ice cream. Sweet summer corn buttermilk sherbert.

The whole put-anything-you-can-find-and-see-if-it-works-in-ice-cream-trend is tasty at times, edgy at best, but has become so ubiquitous that off-color flavors rarely merit a reaction.

That was until I saw the geoduck ice cream sign.

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Written by Anna Brones

September 8, 2012 at 12:57

Travel Transitions

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Missing.

Loving.

Anticipating.

Written by Anna Brones

June 14, 2011 at 21:48

Friday Photo: Blue Lake

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Spent three days of unconnected bliss out in Indian Heaven Wilderness last weekend, camping by the aptly named Blue Lake. There’s a reason that Henry David Thoreau said, “In wilderness is the preservation of the world.” In the backcountry things are still and simple. Just what the overly multi-tasked brain needs.

Written by Anna Brones

September 3, 2010 at 15:08

Snowshoeing Mt. Rainier

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Fresh snow crunches under your feet. Along the trail, paw prints of a small forest creature lead the way. The sun shines. You take a break to drink tea from your thermos and slice of a piece of brie cheese that’s your one gourmet indulgence in the backcountry. You continue along, excited about the prospect of an evening in front of a warm stove in a cozy ski hut. You contemplate to yourself how a winter trip doesn’t get much better than this.

***

Earlier this winter I was craving some snow time, and decided to check out the Mount Tahoma Trails Association hut-to-hut ski trail system, a collection of groomed trails used by the Forest Service in the summer and snowshoers and cross country skiers in the winter. A common obstacle to pursuing winter backcountry adventures is of course that it’s cold and gets dark early, not the optimal tent conditions for most. Fortunately the MTTA maintains several different backcountry accommodations, including a yurt, all complete with propane stoves, sleeping pads and complete kitchens. I wouldn’t go so far as to call it ‘glamping,’ but high end backcountry digs is certainly a fitting definition.

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Save Wild Salmon, Nature and Our Future

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Courtesy of Save Our Wild Salmon

Excited for my article that was posted this week on Planet Green. Here’s an excerpt:

When was the last time you thought about salmon? Sure, it’s a common food, but this one fish is a key link in the chain between environment, recreation, jobs and the economy. In the Pacific Northwest salmon fishing brings tens of millions of dollars into the regional economy each year, representing thousands of jobs.

But salmon runs are in decline, and that hurts the economy and the environment. In fact, this decline is severely affecting the local environment; including another endangered species — Puget Sound Southern Resident orca whales. Scientists say that these fish are the largest single change to the whale’s food supplies and are directly linked to their decline in recent decades. Endangered salmon runs mean that everything that these fish are linked to or have an impact on, from other species to our own economy, is threatened as well. Still think of salmon as just a dinner dish?

In a recent L.A. Times Opinion piece, scientist and author Carl Safina outlined the importance of salmon to the environment and to human beings in general. Safina, the author of Songs for the Blue Ocean and Eye of the Albatross, as well as a well-respected scientist, conservationist and the president of the Blue Ocean Institute, holds that the Obama administration isn’t doing enough to protect these fish, saying that the administration “should embrace salmon abundance as the beating heart of the Pacific Northwest — the flow of energy that connects and sustains people, fishing towns, bears, wolves, orcas, forests and the rivers and seas we all love and use.”

You can read the whole article here, as well as check out 5 simple ways you can take action to save wild salmon.

Written by Anna Brones

February 2, 2010 at 08:38

Winter Sunset

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Frost covered the ground for the larger part of the day, a white dusting remaining in cold corners protected by the shade of trees. Typical Pacific Northwest gray rain clouds were traded for clear winter skies, a brisk nip in the air. On beautiful days like this, it’s clear that the evening landscape shouldn’t be missed, and we packed up a thermos of tea and headed for one of the many rocky beaches of the Puget Sound.

Quiet and clear, as afternoon turned into dusk, the seasonal sun set, with warm colors reflecting off of soft clouds, turning the sky into a winter painting. With the setting sun, the air turned colder, and steam rose from our tea cups as we looked out over the calm waters and breathed in the winds of the season.

That’s how you should spend Christmas Day…

Written by Anna Brones

December 26, 2009 at 13:10